New gTLDs and namespace collision

This is another scratch-pad post that’s aimed at a narrow audience —  network geeks, especially in ISPs and corporations.  The first bit is a 3-minute read, followed by a 20-minute “more detail” section.  If you’re baffled by this, but maybe a little concerned after you read it, please push this page along to your network-geek friends and colleagues and get their reaction.  Feel free to repost any/all of this.

Key points before we get started

  • I don’t know what’s going to happen
  • I don’t know what the impact is going to be, but in some cases it could be severe
  • Others claim to know both of those things but I’m not convinced by their arguments right now
  • Thus, I think the best thing to do is learn more, hope for the best and prepare for the worst
  • My goal with this post is just to give you a heads-up

If I were you, I’d:

  • Scan my private network and see if any of my names collide with the new gTLDs that are coming
  • Check my recursive DNS server logs and see if any name collisions are appearing there
  • Start thinking about remediation now
  • Participate in the discussion of this topic at ICANN, especially if you foresee major impacts
  • Spread the word that this is coming to friends and colleagues

Continue reading “New gTLDs and namespace collision”

Repairing the road

 

So here’s a new thing for me to obsess about.  The condition of the road in the summer time.  This spring was especially tough on our road because the rain. never. stopped.  So our road, which was already getting pretty ratty, turned into a nightmare this year.

Here’s a picture from last year – note the gravel-free tracks through grass.  This is not what a gravel road is supposed to look like.  It’s supposed to have gravel in it, not grass.

 

road-project01 Continue reading “Repairing the road”

A blog post from Fargo – a new gizmo

Dave Winer has a cool new gizmo (Fargo) that I’ve been messing around with for the last week or so (don’t get me all wrapped up in a time warp here).

Why I loves Fargo

  • I loves this gizmo because I’m addicted to outlining and I’m always on the hunt for simpler, more approachable ways to do it (and recruit other addicts). For the most part, I’ve gotten pretty solidly into the “mind mapping” groove, but that’s just a habit. When you boil my use of mind-mapping software down you find that all I’m really doing is outlining. Enough about why Fargo attracts me.

Continue reading “A blog post from Fargo – a new gizmo”

Repainting the SC430

sc430 wallpaper 1OK, I admit it.  I’m kindof a lame car guy.  I love cars, but I am old and tired and hate being uncomfortable.  So about 5 years ago I bought a year-1 (2002) Lexus SC430 that had been rode hard and put away wet for the princely sum of $17000.  I’ve been bringing it back from an early grave ever since.  The first few years were devoted to repairing the driving stuff — replacing bent wheels, struts, etc. Continue reading “Repainting the SC430”

Loading a Comodo free email cert into the Mac OSX Mail.app and iOS

The previous post was all about self-signed certs on my Mac.  Worked fine until I tried to export the cert to my iPhone.  Then I ran into the dreaded “no valid certificates” problem when trying to authorize the profile to sign and encrypt outbound mail.  My homebrew cert worked fine for enabling s/MIME on the device, but it was crippled.  So I ran off and got me a Comodo free email cert and pounded that in. Continue reading “Loading a Comodo free email cert into the Mac OSX Mail.app and iOS”

Notes: adding and using a self-signed s/MIME email certificate to OSX Mail in Mountain Lion

This is just a scratchpad post to remind myself what I did to get a self-signed cert into Mail under OSX Mountain Lion.

This first post is all about using a self-generated cert — which will work fine unless you ALSO want to use it on an iOS device.  In which case, skip to the NEXT post, where I cracked the code of getting a Comodo cert installed on my Mac and my iPhone.  Sheesh, this is harder than it needs to be. Continue reading “Notes: adding and using a self-signed s/MIME email certificate to OSX Mail in Mountain Lion”

Test shots from my new camera (Sony HX30V)

Hi all.  This is partly a test of the new photo-uploader in WordPress 3.5 — along with a chance to show off pictures from the new camera.  Click through the photos if you want to pixel-peep the ginormous originals.

This first one is a test of the panorama feature…  This shot is looking from the point behind the house down Pat’s Prairie towards Highway 88 (south).  The nice thing is how it’s picking up the two valleys that form the point I’m standing on.

Indian Grass Panorama
Indian Grass Panorama

Continue reading “Test shots from my new camera (Sony HX30V)”

Logic Pro runs lots better on my new MacBook Pro

This is mostly a post that only Logic Pro music-software users will like.  But hey.

I just went through an agonized decision-making process to upgrade my MBP.  I knew that the cool new CPUs were coming this summer, but then Apple threw the “Retina” curve-ball at me.  I chewed and chewed on that and finally went with the old-style machine because:

  • It’s cheaper (I saved enough to buy a Thunderbolt display)
  • It’s just as fast (how fast?  see below)
  • It’s got lotsa ports (btw, my Axiom Pro keyboard works fine on the USB 3.0 port)
  • My aging eyes don’t benefit from the Retina display
  • It’s easier to upgrade and repair

Continue reading “Logic Pro runs lots better on my new MacBook Pro”

Frac sand mining

Pore old Haven2.  ‘lil old blog’s being neglected.  I was going to blog about frac sand mining here but the issue kinda exploded into such a big deal that it needed a URL all its own and I forgot to cross-post a link to the new site back here at the ranch.

So here’s a link for those of you that follow me on this blog.  Sorry about that.  Things got a little crazy there for a while and I’m just now circling back to do the housekeeping.

www.FracSandFrisbee.com Continue reading “Frac sand mining”

omni

Omnisphere and Omni TR in Logic Pro 9 — notes to myself

To introduce Omnisphere into a project — just instantiate it the regular way (forget all the Environment stuff, not required).  So 1) create a software track, 2) select Omnisphere (way down at the bottom of the list of software instruments is “all instruments”, Omnisphere is in there).  I’ve been using the “stereo” version rather than “multi output” because I like to freeze the tracks, can’t do that with multi-output version. Continue reading “omni”

Fold-out circular table

This is a series of pictures of our dining-room table.  The cool thing about it is how it folds out — so most of the time it’s a modest little table that four people can sit around.  But folded out, we’ve crammed twelve people around it.  Also great for poker.  This series of pictures shows how it’s put together.

Here’s the table, in it’s 4-person folded-up configuration.

Continue reading “Fold-out circular table”

Broadband connection improvements — avoiding DNS-interception and “buffer bloat”

This whole saga started when I read an Ars-Technica article called “Small ISPs use “malicious” DNS servers to watch web searches, earn cash.”  Here’s the lede that got my attention:

Nearly 2 percent of all US Internet users suffer from “malicious” domain name system (DNS) servers that don’t properly turn website names like google.com into the IP addresses computers need to communicate on the ‘Net. And, to make matters worse, the problem isn’t caused by hackers or malware, but by the local ISPs people pay for access to the Internet.

Continue reading “Broadband connection improvements — avoiding DNS-interception and “buffer bloat””