Adding SSL to my OSX server

I decided it was time to make a little statement and add “always on” encryption to this completely innocuous site.  The online equivalent of moving a lemonade stand inside a bank vault.  Now when you read about refurbishing my car, or fixing a seed drill, you’ll be doing it over an encrypted connection.

This is another scratchpad post for folks who run an OXS Server and want to use a multi-domain UC (unified communications) SSL certificate.  The rest of you can stop here — this is probably the most boring post of all time. Continue reading “Adding SSL to my OSX server”

More bottom!

Samantha Dickinson Tweeted this photo from the ICANN meeting today and tagged it #VolunteerFatigue.  I’m living proof.

ccIANA

Let’s say that each of those 7 working groups needs 4 volunteers — that’s almost 30 people.  Just from the ccNSO.  Just for upcoming working groups.  Never mind the GSNO, ALAC, SSAC and GAC.  A rough extrapolation puts the total required at over 100 volunteer community members just to handle the IANA/Accountability/Transition work.

ICANN is dangerously thin at the bottom of the bottom-up process.  Are there that many people with the experience/time/expertise/will available?  What happens to all the other Working Group work in the meantime?

 

Difference between a customer and a client

There’s a difference between being a customer and being a client.  People on both ends of a relationship always get into trouble when they don’t understand this.

A customer – is always right

A client – expects to hear the truth, especially when it’s unpleasant

This is true in professional relationships.  Doctors, lawyers, accountants are expected to provide good advice in their professional relationship — but their customers are always right.  Reports should be: on time, of high quality, and delivered at a fair price. Continue reading “Difference between a customer and a client”

Using Ableton Live to drive Logic Pro X

This is another scratchpad post to remind myself how I set up two of my favorite digital audio workstations (Ableton Live and Apple Logic Pro X) to run at the same time.  I like facets of each of these systems and want to have the best of both worlds — the live-performance flexibility of Live and the instruments and signal processing of Logic.  In some perfect future, Logic will run as a Rewire slave and a fella won’t have to do all this goofy stuff.  Until then, this is a set of notes on how I do it.  Your mileage may vary.  I’ll will try to respond to your questions as best I can (click HERE to contact me) — but I’ll be sluggish, don’t count on a reply in anything less than 24 hours.

Overview

The goal is to use MIDI coming from Live to control instruments in Logic, and get that audio back into Live.  This is where you’re headed and this diagram may be all you need.

Continue reading “Using Ableton Live to drive Logic Pro X”

Name Collisions II — A call for research

This post is a heads up to all uber-geeks about a terrific research initiative to try to figure out causes and mitigation of name-collision risk.  There’s a $50,000 prize for the first-place paper, a $25,000 prize for the second place paper and up to five $10,000 prizes for third-place papers.  That kind of money could buy a lot of toys, my peepul.  And the presentation of those papers will be in London — my favorite town for curry this side of India.  Interested?  Read on.  Here’s a link to the research program — you can skip the rest of this post and get right to the Real Deal by clicking here:

www.NameCollisions.net

Continue reading “Name Collisions II — A call for research”

Commentary on Fadi Chehadi Montevideo Statement

Beckstrom

I love toiling at the bottom of the bottom-up ICANN process.  And it’s also quite entertaining to watch senior ICANN “managers” running wild and free on the international stage. The disconnect between those two things reminds me of the gulf that usually exists between the faculty and administration in higher education institutions.  Both sides think they run the joint.  That same gulf exists in ICANN and, while I was hopeful for a while that the new guy (Fadi Chehadi) was going to grok the fullness, it’s starting to slide into the same old pattern. Continue reading “Commentary on Fadi Chehadi Montevideo Statement”

What if people stop trusting the ICANN root?

Courtesy FreeDigitalPhotos.net

So once upon a time I worked at a terrific ISP in St. Paul, MN.  Back then, before the “grand bargain” that led to the shared hallucination known as ICANN, there were several pretty-credible providers of DNS that later (somewhat disparagingly) became known as “alternate” root providers.

In those days, we offered our customers a choice.  You could use our “regular” DNS that pointed at what later became the ICANN-managed root, or you could use our “extended” DNS servers that added the alternates.  No big deal, you choose, your mileage may vary, if you run into trouble we’d suggest that you switch back to “regular” and see if things go better, let us know how you like it, etc.

Well.  Fast forward almost 20 years… Continue reading “What if people stop trusting the ICANN root?”

New gTLD preparedness project

Another scratchpad post — this time about what a “get ready for new gTLDs” project might look like.  I’ll try to write these thoughts in a way that scales from your own organization up to world-wide.

I’m doing this with an eye towards pushing this towards ICANN and new-gTLD applicants and saying “y’know, you really should be leading the charge on this.  This is your ‘product’ after all.”  Maybe we could channel a few of those “Digital Engagement” dollars into doing something useful?  You know, actually engage people?  Over a real issue?  Just sayin’

Here we go… Continue reading “New gTLD preparedness project”

New gTLDs and namespace collision

This is another scratch-pad post that’s aimed at a narrow audience —  network geeks, especially in ISPs and corporations.  The first bit is a 3-minute read, followed by a 20-minute “more detail” section.  If you’re baffled by this, but maybe a little concerned after you read it, please push this page along to your network-geek friends and colleagues and get their reaction.  Feel free to repost any/all of this.

Key points before we get started

  • I don’t know what’s going to happen
  • I don’t know what the impact is going to be, but in some cases it could be severe
  • Others claim to know both of those things but I’m not convinced by their arguments right now
  • Thus, I think the best thing to do is learn more, hope for the best and prepare for the worst
  • My goal with this post is just to give you a heads-up

If I were you, I’d:

  • Scan my private network and see if any of my names collide with the new gTLDs that are coming
  • Check my recursive DNS server logs and see if any name collisions are appearing there
  • Start thinking about remediation now
  • Participate in the discussion of this topic at ICANN, especially if you foresee major impacts
  • Spread the word that this is coming to friends and colleagues

Continue reading “New gTLDs and namespace collision”

Repairing the road

 

So here’s a new thing for me to obsess about.  The condition of the road in the summer time.  This spring was especially tough on our road because the rain. never. stopped.  So our road, which was already getting pretty ratty, turned into a nightmare this year.

Here’s a picture from last year – note the gravel-free tracks through grass.  This is not what a gravel road is supposed to look like.  It’s supposed to have gravel in it, not grass.

 

road-project01 Continue reading “Repairing the road”

A blog post from Fargo – a new gizmo

Dave Winer has a cool new gizmo (Fargo) that I’ve been messing around with for the last week or so (don’t get me all wrapped up in a time warp here).

Why I loves Fargo

  • I loves this gizmo because I’m addicted to outlining and I’m always on the hunt for simpler, more approachable ways to do it (and recruit other addicts). For the most part, I’ve gotten pretty solidly into the “mind mapping” groove, but that’s just a habit. When you boil my use of mind-mapping software down you find that all I’m really doing is outlining. Enough about why Fargo attracts me.

Continue reading “A blog post from Fargo – a new gizmo”

Repainting the SC430

sc430 wallpaper 1OK, I admit it.  I’m kindof a lame car guy.  I love cars, but I am old and tired and hate being uncomfortable.  So about 5 years ago I bought a year-1 (2002) Lexus SC430 that had been rode hard and put away wet for the princely sum of $17000.  I’ve been bringing it back from an early grave ever since.  The first few years were devoted to repairing the driving stuff — replacing bent wheels, struts, etc. Continue reading “Repainting the SC430”

Migrating from Snow Leopard Server to OSX Server (Mountain Lion)

Back in late 2011 I wrote this scratchpad post to document my efforts to move from Snow Leopard Server to Lion Server.  I ran into some configuration problems that stumped the 2nd-level folks at Apple and eventually I abandoned the project and stayed on Snow Leopard.

When Mountain Lion came out, and went through an update or two to iron the kinks out, I decided to have another go at it.  I’m crossing my fingers here, but I’ve been on OSX Server (the new/old name under Mountain Lion) for about a month now and things look pretty stable.  So here’s another scratchpad post to document what I did to put back a few things that were removed from the standard OSX Server environment. Continue reading “Migrating from Snow Leopard Server to OSX Server (Mountain Lion)”